The Foreign Policy Disconnect

Should not the American people themselves decide what is in the national interest?4 Many of the “gaps” or “disconnects” betweenthe policy preferences of decision makers andthose of citizens,which will be analyzed in chapter 7, ...

The Foreign Policy Disconnect

With world affairs so troubled, what kind of foreign policy should the United States pursue? Benjamin Page and Marshall Bouton look for answers in a surprising place: among the American people. Drawing on a series of national surveys conducted between 1974 and 2004, Page and Bouton reveal that—contrary to conventional wisdom—Americans generally hold durable, coherent, and sensible opinions about foreign policy. Nonetheless, their opinions often stand in opposition to those of policymakers, usually because of different interests and values, rather than superior wisdom among the elite. The Foreign Policy Disconnect argues that these gaps between leaders and the public are harmful, and that by using public opinion as a guideline policymakers could craft a more effective, sustainable, and democratic foreign policy. Page and Bouton support this argument by painting a uniquely comprehensive portrait of the military, diplomatic, and economic foreign policies Americans favor. They show, for example, that protecting American jobs is just as important to the public as security from attack, a goal the current administration seems to pursue single-mindedly. And contrary to some officials’ unilateral tendencies, the public consistently and overwhelmingly favors cooperative multilateral policy and participation in international treaties. Moreover, Americans’ foreign policy opinions are seldom divided along the usual lines: majorities of virtually all social, ideological, and partisan groups seek a policy that pursues the goals of security and justice through cooperative means. Written in a clear and engaging style, The Foreign Policy Disconnect calls, in an original voice, for a more democratic approach to creating such a policy.

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The Foreign Policy Disconnect
Language: en
Pages: 351
Authors: Benjamin I. Page, Marshall M. Bouton
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-09-15 - Publisher: University of Chicago Press

With world affairs so troubled, what kind of foreign policy should the United States pursue? Benjamin Page and Marshall Bouton look for answers in a surprising place: among the American people. Drawing on a series of national surveys conducted between 1974 and 2004, Page and Bouton reveal that—contrary to conventional
Disconnect
Language: en
Pages: 192
Authors: Tero Karppi
Categories: Computers
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-10-16 - Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

An urgent examination of the threat posed to social media by user disconnection, and the measures websites will take to prevent it No matter how pervasive and powerful social media websites become, users always have the option of disconnecting—right? Not exactly, as Tero Karppi reveals in this disquieting book. Pointing
Disconnect
Language: en
Pages: 376
Authors: Morris P. Fiorina
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-03-30 - Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

Red states, blue states . . . are we no longer the United States? Morris P. Fiorina here examines today’s party system to reassess arguments about party polarization while offering a cogent overview of the American electorate. Building on the arguments of Fiorina’s acclaimed Culture War? The Myth of a
Disconnect
Language: en
Pages: 128
Authors: Lois Peterson
Categories: Juvenile Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-09-01 - Publisher: Orca Book Publishers

The connection to faraway friends comes at a high cost for Daria.
Disconnect
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Cristina Lope Yl Rosello
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-05-20 - Publisher: Flipside Digital Content Company Inc.

Disconnect: The Filipino Comfort Women portrays the inner worlds of elderly women survivors of the Pacific War as they grapple with their psychological and historical disconnection, following the fifty-year postwar silence of sexual enslavement and captivity. Victimized at puberty, ego formation was nipped in the bud. When the war ended,