Archaeological Perspectives on the Battle of the Little Bighorn

On the basis of the archaeological evidence presented in this book, we know more about what kinds of weapons were used against the cavalry.

Archaeological Perspectives on the Battle of the Little Bighorn

Ever since the Custer massacres on June 25, 1876, the question has been asked: What happened - what REALLY happened - at the Battle of the Little Bighorn? We know some of the answers, because half of George Armstrong Custer’s Seventh Cavalry - the men with Major Marcus Reno and Captain Frederick Benteen - survived the fight, but what of the half that did not, the troopers, civilians, scouts, and journalist who were with Custer? Now, because a grass fire in August 1983 cleared the terrain of brush and grass and made possible thorough archaeological examinations of the battlefield in 1984 and 1985, we have many answers to important questions. On the basis of the archaeological evidence presented in this book, we know more about what kinds of weapons were used against the cavalry. We know exactly where many of the men fought, how they died, and what happened to their bodies at the time of or after death. We know how the troopers were deployed, what kind of clothing they wore, what kind of equipment they had, how they fought. Through the techniques of historical archaeology and forensic anthropology, the remains and grave of one of Custer’s scouts, Mitch Boyer, have been identified. And through geomorphology and the process of elimination, we know with almost 100 percent certainty where the twenty-eight missing men who supposedly were buried en masse in Deep Ravine will be found.

More Books:

Archaeological Perspectives on the Battle of the Little Bighorn
Language: en
Pages: 328
Authors: Melissa A. Connor, Douglas D. Scott, Dick Harmon, Richard A. Fox
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-05-01 - Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

Ever since the Custer massacres on June 25, 1876, the question has been asked: What happened - what REALLY happened - at the Battle of the Little Bighorn? We know some of the answers, because half of George Armstrong Custer’s Seventh Cavalry - the men with Major Marcus Reno and
Archaeological Perspectives on the Battle of the Little Bighorn
Language: en
Pages: 328
Authors: Douglas D. Scott, Richard A. Fox, Melissa A. Connor, Dick Harmon
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-05-01 - Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

Ever since the Custer massacres on June 25, 1876, the question has been asked: What happened - what REALLY happened - at the Battle of the Little Bighorn? We know some of the answers, because half of George Armstrong Custer’s Seventh Cavalry - the men with Major Marcus Reno and
Archaeological Perspectives on Warfare on the Great Plains
Language: en
Pages: 448
Authors: Andrew Clark, Douglas Bamforth
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-05-15 - Publisher: University Press of Colorado

The Great Plains has been central to academic and popular visions of Native American warfare, largely because the region’s well-documented violence was so central to the expansion of Euroamerican settlement. However, social violence has deep roots on the Plains beyond this post-Contact perception, and these roots have not been systematically
On the Prairie of Palo Alto: Historical Archaeology of the U.S.–Mexican War Battlefield
Language: en
Pages: 227
Authors: Charles M. Haecker
Categories: Archaeology and history
Type: BOOK - Published: 1997 - Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

"One need not be schooled in military history or archaeology to benefit from this research, for the authors do an excellent job of maintaining the interest of [both] the scholarly reader and anyone new to these subjects."--Journal of the West
The Battle of the Greasy Grass/Little Bighorn
Language: en
Pages: 232
Authors: Debra Buchholtz
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-10-28 - Publisher: Routledge

In June of 1876, the U.S. government’s plan to pressure the Lakota and Cheyenne people onto reservations came to a dramatic and violent end with a battle that would become enshrined in American memory. In the eyes of many Americans at the time, the Battle of Little Bighorn represented a